Conservative Think Tank Blasts USPS Delivery Cuts

It’s no secret that the U.S. Postal Service seems much more interested in building its package courier services right now than in boosting its regular plain mail delivery.

Just look at the USPS’s latest quarterly financial report for the period ended June 30 that recorded a nearly 11% increase in package revenue over the same period last year http://about.usps.com/news/national-releases/2015/pr15_046.htm.

“The continued growth of our shipping and package services is a direct result of the Postal Service’s continued efforts to offer consumers more choice, excellent value and reliable service in a growing and competitive marketplace,” said Postmaster General Megan Brennan, in a statement. “We are investing in our network and continually enhancing our services to best compete for America’s shipping and package delivery business.”

There you have it. And this attitude is nothing at all new.

This, of course, is coupled with deliberate cuts in service and lower delivery standards all over the country, which are definitely reversible, according to savethepostoffice.com which strongly asserts that the USPS can afford to bring back its previous service standards http://www.savethepostoffice.com/true-cost-restoring-service-standards-and-why-postal-service-can-afford-it.

Things are so bad that George Landrith, president of Frontiers of Freedom—a conservative-leaning think tank–has decried how the postal service—the country’s oldest institution—is failing America http://www.courier-journal.com/story/opinion/2015/08/07/us-postal-service-failing-ky-united-states/3132024/.

It’s refreshing to see someone on that side of the aisle to espouse such views when some similar groups often call for privatization, if not the eventual abolition of the USPS, with the usual tired disingenuous rhetoric of how the USPS is obsolete in the digital age.

Landrith offered these comments in an opinion piece in the Louisville Courier-Journal in which he blasted the effects of USPS delivery cuts in rural areas of that state.

He joins a growing chorus of voices that include many now-underserved customers, business people and Senators, including Jon Tester (D-MT) to last month propose legislation to restore prior standards http://www.tester.senate.gov/?p=press_release&id=4043.

If an organization dedicated to limited government, free markets and the like is calling for the USPS to resume its earlier performance standards, then you know it’s what everybody in the country wants and needs.

Meanwhile, the American Postal Workers Union (APWU) launched a petition drive and has called on the Federal Trade Commission to nix the proposed merger of office supplies giants Staples and Office Depot. The union contends this merger would give the combined entity a virtual monopoly in that business.

More importantly, this would strongly hamper the APWU’s efforts to fight Staples’ drive to sell postal products at its stores and pay its employees far less than union wages that postal workers http://www.apwu.org/news/web-news-article/apwu-launches-petition-drive-against-staples-office-depot-merger.

This week, the National Labor Relations Board is supposed to take up the APWU’s complaint that the postal service’s arrangement with Staples violates its collectively bargained labor contract with the USPS.

Wouldn’t be interesting if the FTC took on the proposed Staples-Office Depot merger as well? Maybe that would restore some faith in the federal government’s responsibility to rein in abusive business practices.

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